Category: Uncategorized

Introducing a New Approach to Labor Mobility

This post was first published at the Center for Global Development.

OECD countries face a growing elderly population and a shrinking working-age population, while low-income countries have working-age populations that are growing faster than jobs can absorb them. Labor mobility offers a solution, connecting potential migrants (who need jobs) to potential employers (who need workers). The Connecting International Labor Markets working group convened around the question of how to make this happen, resulting in a proposal for a new organization: Labor Mobility Partnerships (LaMP).

Migrant Health Workers are on the COVID-19 Frontline: We Need More of Them

This online talk is hosted by Crawford School of Public Policy’s Development Policy Center and features CGD’s Helen Dempster and LaMP’s Rebekah Smith.

In most high-income countries, migrants make up a large share of health workers and are more likely to be on the frontline of the COVID-19 response. Yet, despite this reliance, most high-income countries have been resistant to increasing health worker migration for two reasons: concern over skill levels, and concern over ‘brain drain’ from low-income countries. COVID-19 is proving that many of these barriers are surmountable in times of crisis, and must be overcome, both to combat pandemics, and to address broader patterns of aging demographics.

In this talk, Helen Dempster and Rebekah Smith discussed ways in which we can address global health worker shortages during pandemics, and, in the long-term, build up the global stock of health workers to address increasingly worrying demographic impacts. This talk is based on the recently published blog post, “Migrant Health Workers Are on the COVID-19 Frontline. We Need More of Them.”

PRESENTERS

Helen Dempster is the Assistant Director and Senior Associate for Policy Outreach for the Migration, Displacement, and Humanitarian Policy Program at the Center for Global Development (CGD). Prior to joining CGD, she worked for five years in research communications at the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) and the International Growth Centre (IGC).

Rebekah Smith is a Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for Global Development, working with the migration, displacement, and humanitarian policy team. She is the Founder and Executive Director of Labor Mobility Partnerships (LaMP), a new organization which incubated inside of CGD. Previously, Smith worked at the World Bank, building institutions in countries (sending, receiving and transit) to facilitate labor migration.

The Future is Older

OECD countries are rapidly aging – their working age populations are shrinking, while their elderly populations are growing. This has significant fiscal and economic implications for these societies, yet thus far there has been no serious policy response. In this blog, Lant Pritchett explores these historically unprecedented and largely ignored trends.

Welcome to the LaMP blog!

Welcome to the Labor Mobility Partnerships (LaMP) blog! LaMP is a new organization currently incubating at the Center for Global Development. LaMP aims to be the first organization which actively works to increase rights-respecting labor mobility, creating opportunities for needed workers to fill jobs abroad while unlocking billions in income gains.

The Benefits of ‘Untying’: How to Move from Employer- to Occupation-Specific Work Permits

Agriculture workers on a strawberry farm (c) World Bank, September 2007

This post was first published at the Center for Global Development.

Untying’ work permits can reduce workers’ vulnerabilities, strengthen their wages, and improve employer productivity. But these benefits can only be realized if practical barriers to changing employers are removed. Here, we describe how. 

Alleviating Global Poverty: Labor Mobility, Direct Assistance, and Economic Growth

Originally published here with the Center for Global Development

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Decades of programmatic experimentation by development NGOs combined with the latest empirical techniques for estimating program impact have shown that a well-designed, well-implemented, multi-faceted intervention can in fact have an apparently sustained impact on the incomes of the poor (Banerjee et al 2015). The magnitude of the income gains of the “best you can do” via direct interventions to raise the income of the poor in situ is about 40 times smaller than the income gain from allowing people from those same poor countries to work in a high productivity country like the USA. Simply allowing more labor mobility holds vastly more promise for reducing poverty than anything else on the development agenda. That said, the magnitude of the gains from large growth accelerations (and losses from large decelerations) are also many-fold larger than the potential gains from directed individual interventions and the poverty reduction gains from large, extended periods of rapid growth are larger than from targeted interventions and also hold promise (and have delivered) for reducing global poverty.