Workers on the Move: Addressing Global Workforce Challenges Through Labor Mobility Partnerships

Friday June 26 | 11.30 – 12.30 ET | Online

PRESENTERS

PANELISTS

  • Gonzalo Fanjul, Co-founder and Head of Research, PorCausa
  • Ratna Omidvar, Independent Senator for Ontario, Senate of Canada
  • Julia Onslow-Cole, Global Government Strategies and Compliance Partner, Fragomen

MODERATOR

  • Michael Clemens, Director of Migration, Displacement, and Humanitarian Policy and Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development

ABOUT THE EVENT

Between 2050 and 2080, OECD countries will need at least 400 million new workers to maintain current pension and health schemes, resulting from a shrinking working-age population and a growing elderly population. Meanwhile, working-age populations in developing countries are growing faster than job creation, meaning large numbers will need to find jobs elsewhere. This creates an opportunity; workers who find jobs in richer countries can expect to increase their income by 6 to 15 times, making mobility a powerful tool for alleviating poverty.

However, the question looms of how labor market needs of this scale can be met. The current migrant population in OECD countries is at 119 million–far short of the estimated 400+ million needed in the not-distant future. All stakeholders would benefit from a system through which actors cooperate to better facilitate labor mobility, but face risks and constraints from cooperation which prevent this.

In this event, we will discuss these constraints to coordinated action on labor mobility, and how external support could help address these constraints. In response to existing gaps in this support, we will discuss the design of a new organization, Labor Mobility Partnerships (LaMP) which will work with governments, the private sector and employers, ‘mobility industry,’ financiers, and civil society to increase rights-respecting labor mobility, ensuring workers can access employment opportunities abroad.


Migrant Health Workers are on the COVID-19 Frontline: We Need More of Them

Tuesday April 28 | 8.30 – 9.30 ET | Online

This online talk is hosted by Crawford School of Public Policy’s Development Policy Center and features CGD’s Helen Dempster and LaMP’s Rebekah Smith.

In most high-income countries, migrants make up a large share of health workers and are more likely to be on the frontline of the COVID-19 response. Yet, despite this reliance, most high-income countries have been resistant to increasing health worker migration for two reasons: concern over skill levels, and concern over ‘brain drain’ from low-income countries. COVID-19 is proving that many of these barriers are surmountable in times of crisis, and must be overcome, both to combat pandemics, and to address broader patterns of aging demographics.

In this talk, Helen Dempster and Rebekah Smith will discuss ways in which we can address global health worker shortages during pandemics, and, in the long-term, build up the global stock of health workers to address increasingly worrying demographic impacts. This talk is based on the recently published blog post, “Migrant Health Workers Are on the COVID-19 Frontline. We Need More of Them.”

PRESENTERS

Helen Dempster is the Assistant Director and Senior Associate for Policy Outreach for the Migration, Displacement, and Humanitarian Policy Program at the Center for Global Development (CGD). Prior to joining CGD, she worked for five years in research communications at the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) and the International Growth Centre (IGC).

Rebekah Smith is a Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for Global Development, working with the migration, displacement, and humanitarian policy team. She is the Founder and Executive Director of Labor Mobility Partnerships (LaMP), a new organization which incubated inside of CGD. Previously, Smith worked at the World Bank, building institutions in countries (sending, receiving and transit) to facilitate labor migration.